Category: Issues (page 1 of 128)

When Labor Fought for Civil Rights

When Labor Fought for Civil Rights

The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order—memorialized in the classic anthology of that title edited by Gary Gerstle and Steve Fraser in 1989—might be history, but it never gets old. Eighty-plus years after FDR was inaugurated, the New Deal still excites the liberal left imagination even as it, perhaps, stunts it, too. How we got from Roosevelt to Reagan continues to generate conflicting arguments from those who think the New Deal was the “great exception” to American individualism and federalism unlikely to be repeated (Jefferson Cowie); a reluctant capitulation to the white supremacist South which was the best it could do (Ira Katznelson); or, an honorable surrender following the desperate rearguard fight by workers and farmers against the consolidation of corporate capitalism in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries (Steve Fraser).

As for white unionized workers, despite all of the stories about how pissed off they are at neoliberal Democrats and how they were attracted to Donald Trump’s trade message, the fact remains that white men in unions have still voted for Democrats at a rate of about 20 percent higher than their non-union counterparts. (This pattern likely did not hold this year. Exit polls from the 2016 election indicate that Clinton carried the union vote by 51–43, the lowest margin for a Democrat since 1984.)

Two recent books about the New Deal order, one by political scientist Eric Schickler and the other by legal historian Reuel Schiller, complement each other in their attention to the relationship between unions and the movement for African-American civil rights. But while Schickler writes a story of liberal ascension, driven largely by the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), stopping in 1965 after the monumental legislation of the civil rights era, Schiller chronicles a liberal declension, ending with deindustrialization in the 1970s and tension between labor and civil rights activists. Both books end at roughly the same historical moment. Schickler sees in it labor liberalism’s triumph—the CIO and then the civil rights movement pushing to bring racial justice into the mainstream of the Democratic Party. Schiller, on the other hand, sees the labor movement and those fighting racial injustice, despite their many efforts to work together, as chained to separate legal protocols, doomed to “[talk] past each other.” To paraphrase Bob Dylan, for Schickler, labor liberalism is busy being born at the same time, according to Schiller, it is busy dying.

When Labor Fought for Civil Rights | Dissent Magazine

Rich Yeselson ▪ Winter 2017 Racial Realignment: The Transformation of American Liberalism, 1932-1965 by Eric Schickler Princeton University Press, 2016, 384 pp. Forging Rivals: Race, Class, Law, and the Collapse of Postwar Liberalism by Reuel Schiller Cambridge University Press, 2015, 355 pp.

Republicans: Men shouldn’t have to pay for prenatal care, but women should have to pay for men’s Viagra prescriptions

In the 27 hours the House Energy and Commerce Committee spent debating Republicans’ Obamacare revision plan, a handful of moments stand out.

This is one of them.

So, as a middle-aged childless man you resent having to pay for maternity care or kids’ dental care. Shouldn’t turnabout…

Posted by Democrats of the 5th Congressional District of Virginia on Friday, March 10, 2017

 
Health insurance, like all insurance, works by pooling risks. The healthy subsidize the sick, who could be somebody else this year and you next year. Those risks include any kind of health care a person might need from birth to death — prenatal care through hospice. No individual is likely to need all of it, but we will all need some of it eventually.

ACTION ALERT: 5th District Town Hall

On Sunday, Feb. 26, more than 1,200 people attended the People’s Town Hall at the MLK Performing Arts Center.

Our moderators, Saad and Kibiriti, did an incredible job. Dozens of you shared powerful stories and important questions, and we raised more than $3,000 for Amnesty International. We’re very disappointed that Congressman Garrett chose not to attend, but we recorded the whole event for his (and your) viewing pleasure.

Since our event, Rep. Garrett announced that he will be holding a “town hall” in Charlottesville for 135 people on March 31. That is absurdly inadequate, especially in light of the huge response we saw with the People’s Town Hall. We’re asking Rep. Garrett to plan a real town hall at a venue that can accommodate the thousands of concerned citizens who want to meet with him. If he moves forward with his tiny event, we’ll hold a rally to show him what democracy looks like.

We’re going to deliver that message to Tom Garrett directly this Monday, March 6, at 1 p.m.!

Monday is a District Work Day, and Garrett is scheduled to be at his Charlottesville office to meet with constituents. So this week, we’ll be having Monday with Tom, and we know he’ll be there to hear us! Gather outside of the Daily Progress (685 Rio Road West in Charlottesville) at 1 p.m., and we’ll walk over to Garrett’s office (686 Berkmar Circle) together. Bring a poster with your question or concern for the congressman!

Call Congressman Tom Garrett (202-225-4711) and ask him to hold a real town hall meeting, not a tiny lecture. We expect our representatives to be responsive to our concerns. Tom Garrett can’t represent us if he doesn’t meet us.  Click here for a script

If you are able, please try to park in the surrounding area to make room in the Berkmar lot for those with appointments or others who work in the area. We want to respect the other businesses and not block entrances.

Thank you again for your tremendous support. The People’s Town Hall was a monumental success, but it’s not the end of the road. We’ve got a lot of work to do, but we’re standing indivisible, and we’ve got this!

In solidarity,

Patrick for Indivisible Charlottesville

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The Great Correction

The Great Correction

Eliza Gilkyson’s latest video, set to her song “the Great Correction,” features a collection of powerful photos depicting the brave souls who, throughout this nation’s history, fought for a decent society and a protected and loved planet.

 

Quote: Malala Yousafzai

  1. Person on park bench: Daniel Lobo via Flickr Creative Commons (original is in color)
  2. Manhattan Skyline: Stefan Georgi via Flickr CC (original is in color)
  1. Statue of Liberty at Sunset: Michael from NYC via Flickr CC (original is in color)
  2. Los Angeles Traffic: Jim Sheaffer via Flickr CC
  3. Subway and Cellphones: Gonzalo G. Useta via Flickr CC
  4. Hurricane Katrina: News Muse via Flickr CC

Quote: Black Elk

  1. 50’s Billboard: Dorothea Lange via Library of Congress
  2. Homeless person with cart: Stefan Georgi via Flickr CC
  3. Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890: Trager & Kuhn via Wikimedia CC
  4. Nixon and flag:  Raymond Depardon courtesy of Magnum Photos
  5. Civil War re-enactors with kids: Bruce Davidson courtesy of Magnum Photos
  6. Sun: Bruno Caimi via Flickr CC

Quote: Rivera Sun

  1. Cheyenne woman Pretty Nose, war chief at Little Bighorn: Laton Alton Huffman via Wikimedia CC
  2. Sojourner Truth: Photographer unknown via Wikimedia CC
  3. John Muir: Unattributed via Library of Congress
  4. Pueblo Indian Delegation at White House 1923: Underwood & Underwood via Library of Congress
  5. Frederick Douglass: George Kendall Warren via National Archives and Records Administration
  6. Ida Wells: Photographer unknown
  7. Child slavery protest: Unattributed via Library of Congress
  8. Women’s suffrage rally 1916: licensed from Shutterstock
  9. Woolworth Strikers 1937: Unattributed via Library of Congress
  10. Miners at the Virginia-Pocahontas Coal Mine: Jack Corn for US National Archives
  11. Border family: Sandy Huffaker
  12. Playing in the fountain – Alex Webb – courtesy of Magnum Photos
  13. Anti-Vietnam War March 1969: Wystan via Flickr CC
  14. Vietnam protest-Leonard Freed – courtesy of Magnum Photos
  15. The Longest Walk: Seth Roffman

Quote: Oscar Romero

  1. We March with Selma 1965 by Stanley Wolfson via Library of Congress
  2. Firehoses and marchers in Montgomery: Bruce Davidson courtesy of Magnum Photos
  3. Anthony Quin arrest sequence Montgomery: Matt Herron courtesy of Take Stock/The Imageworks
  4. Martin Luther King Jr , Coretta Scott King and Abernathy family: Matt Herron courtesy of Take Stock/The Imageworks
  5. Cesar Chavez Grape Strike NFWA: George Ballis – courtesy of Take Stock/The Imageworks
  6. Dolores HuertaGeorge Ballis – courtesy of Take Stock / The Imageworks
  7. Lesbian, Gay and Bi Rights March in Washington DC 1993: Constantine Manos – courtesy of Magnum Photos
  8. Gay rights demonstration at the DNC 1976: Warren Leffler via Library of Congress
  9. Harvey Milk: Danny Nicoletta
  10. Nina Simone: Dutch National Archives
  1. John Trudell: Nels Israelson (courtesy of John Trudell Archives)
  2. Woody Guthrie: courtesy of Woody Guthrie Publications
  3. Pete Seeger and Joan Baez: Claire Smith

Quote: Chief Joseph

  1. Orlando Vigil-Brian Feinzimer
  2. Keystone XL Protest: Joe Brusky via Flickr CC
  3. Hamilton High students: Lisa Law
  4. One Billion Rising March in Santa Fe: Seth Roffman
  5. A Future to Believe In: Dan Potter
  6. People’s Climate March 2014: Stephen Melkisethian via Flickr CC
  7. Trump Protest in Los Angeles: Ken Shin via Flickr CC
  8. Statue of Liberty: Lisa Law
  9. Occupy Wall St 2011: Zach D Roberts via Flickr CC
  10. Black & Brown Lives Matter: Joe Brusky via Flickr CC
  11. MLK The Great Freedom March to Montgomery: Bruce Davidson – courtesy of Magnum Photos

Quote: James Baldwin

  1. Standing Rock tipi: Dan Potter
  2. Standing Rock water cannons: Avery Leigh White
  3. Standing Rock water cannons frontlines: Avery Leigh White
  4. Standing Rock water protector: Avery Leigh White
  5. Standing Rock frontline medics: Avery Leigh White
  6. Standing Rock water protestor in gas mask: Avery Leigh White
  7. Veterans March in blizzard at Standing Rock: Avery Leigh White
  8. Veterans for Standing Rock handshake: Larry Towell – courtesy of Magnum Photos
  9. Anti-Trump Rally Costa Mesa: Brian Feinzimer
  10. Trump Protest LA 1: Brian Feinzimer
  11. Trump Protest LA 2: Brian Feinzimer
  12. Women’s March on Washington: Mobilus in Mobili via Flickr CC
  13. You are Beautiful: Brian Feinzimer
  14. Black Lives Matter: Alisdare Hickson via Flickr CC
  15. Refugees Welcome: Geoff Livingston via Flickr CC
  16. We Must Rise Together: Brian Feinzimer

Quote: Ida Wells

The Movement Resisting Donald Trump Has A Name: The (Local) Democratic Party

While outside groups are getting the attention, local Democratic parties nationwide are seeing a surge of interest.

By Ryan Grim , Amanda Terkel

The Movement Resisting Donald Trump Has A Name: The (Local) Democratic Party

Local Democratic parties are confronting a problem in the Trump era that is as confounding as it is unexpected: space. “I’m as busy this year as I was at any time last year in the heat of a huge election,” said Mark Fraley, chairman of the Monroe County Democratic Party in Indiana.

The resistance to President Donald Trump has taken a variety of forms, all of them well chronicled by the media. The Women’s March, which saw some 5 million people take to the streets in a single day, helped fuel the growth of Indivisible chapters around the country, and has itself continued organizing meetings and protests since. The groups Swing Left, Flippable and The Sister District Project are routing people to swing districts where they can be most effective.

Democrats have already won two special elections in Virginia since November, and the state House and governor’s mansion will be up for grabs this fall.  If Democrats can ride a new wave into power, the gerrymandering of 2010 can be rolled back.  Local officials say they’re focused on creating a positive vision and a constant stream of activities to keep these new activists engaged.

Amid it all, observers and participants alike have wondered what the name is for this nascent movement. The Resistance? The Opposition?

But if the swelling ranks of county-level meetings are an indication of things to come, the grassroots movement underway already has a name. It’s called the Democratic Party.

Shocked by the outcome of the election and fearful for the future of the country, people of all ages, some of them Democrats, some independents, some Greens, found the time and location of a local party meeting and showed up.

Here are a few of their stories.

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