Category: Madison County (Page 1 of 18)

Intro to Votebuilder (VAN)

Votebuilder is the common name for the Voter Activation Network (VAN). It is a collaborative project between the Democratic National Committee, the Virginia Democratic Party, local party units, and Democratic campaigns in Virginia.

In recent years, Votebuilder has become the backbone of nearly every major Democratic campaign. In simple terms, it is an online database management program that allows campaigns to easily utilize the state voter records to mobilize Democratic voters and volunteers.

The default data in Votebuilder comes from voter registration records maintained by the Virginia Department of Elections. This includes name, address, home phone number, vote history, and more. There are also pieces of data that are provided by the Democratic Party, like scores and cell phone numbers. This part of Votebuilder is known as My Voters. Anyone who is a registered voter in Virginia will appear in the My Voters side of Votebuilder. As of 3/7/22, there are 9,706 registered voters in Madison County.

Everything else in Votebuilder is data that campaigns and local committees add to the system over the course of the cycle. One of the data sets unique to each campaign is the My Campaign part of Votebuilder. Whereas My Voters is based on information the Dept. of Elections provides, My Campaign is based purely on data that each individual campaign enters into the system. If a campaign is using Votebuilder for the first time there will not be any records in the My Campaign side of Votebuilder. Records must be added by the campaign itself.

Take Back the House! Tri-County Democratic Dinner

Culpeper, Madison and Orange

Tri-County Democratic Dinner

Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 6 p.m.

Lake of the Woods Clubhouse
205 Lakeview Parkway, Locust Grove, Virginia 22508

With Featured Speakers

Congressman Don McEachin

4th Congressional District
https://mceachin.house.gov/

and

Ben Hixon

Candidate, 30th District
Virginia House of Delegates
http://benhixon.com/

Join us at the LOW clubhouse for a buffet dinner, and to talk about Virginia’s, and America’s future. Festivities begin with a cash bar from 6 to 7 p.m.  Dinner is at 6:45 with Virginia Ham, Atlantic Cod, Red Bliss Potatoes, Vegetable Medley and Apple Pie. (Please let us know if vegetarian or vegan choices are preferred.)

$50 per person with proceeds to the Ben Hixon campaign.

http://bit.ly/30thDems

 Please reserve your seats by May 24.

Prefer to pay by cash or check?
Please call Sheila Clark at 540-972-0305
or email sheilaclark769@gmail.com.

 

30th District Call to Convention

Whereas it is the duty of the Culpeper County Democratic Committee to issue the Call to Caucus for the purpose of electing delegates to the 2017 30th District (Orange, Madison and Part of Culpeper) House of Delegates District Democratic Convention which will be held on the 29th day of April in 2017, beginning at 10 am, in the Culpeper County Democratic Committee Head Quarters located at 102 North Main Street, Culpeper, VA, 22701, on the second floor. Now therefore be it resolved that the Culpeper County Democratic Committee hereby issues the Call to Convention for the 2017 Democratic Party Caucus to convene at noon, at the Culpeper Co. Democratic Committee 102 North Main Street, Culpeper, VA, 22701 for the sole purpose of electing delegates to the 30th House of Delegates District Democratic Convention.

Convention to be held on Apr 29, 2017

Download 30th District Convention packet

Our candidates:

Ben Hixon

WebsiteFacebook
Twitter

Annette Hyde

WebsiteFacebook
Twitter

The Movement Resisting Donald Trump Has A Name: The (Local) Democratic Party

While outside groups are getting the attention, local Democratic parties nationwide are seeing a surge of interest.

By Ryan Grim , Amanda Terkel
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/democratic-party-trump_us_58ac7f3ce4b0c4d5105717e0

The resistance to President Donald Trump has taken a variety of forms, all of them well chronicled by the media. The Women’s March, which saw some 5 million people take to the streets in a single day, helped fuel the growth of Indivisible chapters around the country, and has itself continued organizing meetings and protests since. The groups Swing Left, Flippable and The Sister District Project are routing people to swing districts where they can be most effective.

[intense_alert block=”1″ margin_bottom=”25″]Democrats have already won two special elections in Virginia since November, and the state House and governor’s mansion will be up for grabs this fall.  If Democrats can ride a new wave into power, the gerrymandering of 2010 can be rolled back.  Local officials say they’re focused on creating a positive vision and a constant stream of activities to keep these new activists engaged.[/intense_alert]

Amid it all, observers and participants alike have wondered what the name is for this nascent movement. The Resistance? The Opposition?

But if the swelling ranks of county-level meetings are an indication of things to come, the grassroots movement underway already has a name. It’s called the Democratic Party.

Shocked by the outcome of the election and fearful for the future of the country, people of all ages, some of them Democrats, some independents, some Greens, found the time and location of a local party meeting and showed up.

Here are a few of their stories.

Phoenix Rising?

A new, liberal tea party is forming. Can it last without turning against Democrats?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/a-new-liberal-tea-party-is-forming-can-it-last-without-turning-on-democrats/2017/02/11/94421200-efdf-11e6-9973-c5efb7ccfb0d_story.html

It’s a well-worn story now about how John A. Boehner, then House minority leader, joined a rising star in his caucus, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, in April 2009 for one of the first major tea party protests in the California Republican’s home town of Bakersfield.

A little more than six years later, after they surfed that wave into power, the movement consumed both of them. Boehner was driven out of the House speaker’s office and McCarthy’s expected succession fell apart, leaving him stuck at the rank of majority leader.

[intense_alert]
The women’s marches that brought millions onto streets across the country the day after Trump’s inauguration — spurred organically through social media — opened Democratic leaders’ eyes to the possibilities.
[/intense_alert]
 
Democrats are well aware of that history as they try to tap the energy of the roiling liberal activists who have staged rallies and marches in the first three weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency.

 

According to data collected by Erica Chenoweth at the University of Denver and Jeremy Pressman at the University of Connecticut, marches held in more than 600 US cities were attended by at least 4.2 million people.

What if they can fuse these protesters, many of whom have never been politically active, into the liberal firmament? What if a new tea party is arising, with the energy and enthusiasm to bring out new voters and make a real difference at the polls, starting with the 2018 midterm elections?

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