Category: Madison County (page 1 of 17)

30th District Call to Convention

Whereas it is the duty of the Culpeper County Democratic Committee to issue the Call to Caucus for the purpose of electing delegates to the 2017 30th District (Orange, Madison and Part of Culpeper) House of Delegates District Democratic Convention which will be held on the 29th day of April in 2017, beginning at 10 am, in the Culpeper County Democratic Committee Head Quarters located at 102 North Main Street, Culpeper, VA, 22701, on the second floor. Now therefore be it resolved that the Culpeper County Democratic Committee hereby issues the Call to Convention for the 2017 Democratic Party Caucus to convene at noon, at the Culpeper Co. Democratic Committee 102 North Main Street, Culpeper, VA, 22701 for the sole purpose of electing delegates to the 30th House of Delegates District Democratic Convention.

Convention to be held on Apr 29, 2017

Download 30th District Convention packet

Our candidates:

Ben Hixon

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Annette Hyde

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The Movement Resisting Donald Trump Has A Name: The (Local) Democratic Party

While outside groups are getting the attention, local Democratic parties nationwide are seeing a surge of interest.

By Ryan Grim , Amanda Terkel

The Movement Resisting Donald Trump Has A Name: The (Local) Democratic Party

Local Democratic parties are confronting a problem in the Trump era that is as confounding as it is unexpected: space. “I’m as busy this year as I was at any time last year in the heat of a huge election,” said Mark Fraley, chairman of the Monroe County Democratic Party in Indiana.

The resistance to President Donald Trump has taken a variety of forms, all of them well chronicled by the media. The Women’s March, which saw some 5 million people take to the streets in a single day, helped fuel the growth of Indivisible chapters around the country, and has itself continued organizing meetings and protests since. The groups Swing Left, Flippable and The Sister District Project are routing people to swing districts where they can be most effective.

Democrats have already won two special elections in Virginia since November, and the state House and governor’s mansion will be up for grabs this fall.  If Democrats can ride a new wave into power, the gerrymandering of 2010 can be rolled back.  Local officials say they’re focused on creating a positive vision and a constant stream of activities to keep these new activists engaged.

Amid it all, observers and participants alike have wondered what the name is for this nascent movement. The Resistance? The Opposition?

But if the swelling ranks of county-level meetings are an indication of things to come, the grassroots movement underway already has a name. It’s called the Democratic Party.

Shocked by the outcome of the election and fearful for the future of the country, people of all ages, some of them Democrats, some independents, some Greens, found the time and location of a local party meeting and showed up.

Here are a few of their stories.

Phoenix Rising?

A new, liberal tea party is forming. Can it last without turning against Democrats?

A new, liberal tea party is forming. Can it last without turning on Democrats?

Grassroots movements can be the life and death of political leaders. It’s a well-worn story now about how John Boehner, then House minority leader, joined a rising star in his caucus, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, in April 2009 for one of the first major tea party protests in the California Republican’s hometown of Bakersfield.

It’s a well-worn story now about how John A. Boehner, then House minority leader, joined a rising star in his caucus, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, in April 2009 for one of the first major tea party protests in the California Republican’s home town of Bakersfield.

A little more than six years later, after they surfed that wave into power, the movement consumed both of them. Boehner was driven out of the House speaker’s office and McCarthy’s expected succession fell apart, leaving him stuck at the rank of majority leader.

The women’s marches that brought millions onto streets across the country the day after Trump’s inauguration — spurred organically through social media — opened Democratic leaders’ eyes to the possibilities.
 
Democrats are well aware of that history as they try to tap the energy of the roiling liberal activists who have staged rallies and marches in the first three weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency.

 

According to data collected by Erica Chenoweth at the University of Denver and Jeremy Pressman at the University of Connecticut, marches held in more than 600 US cities were attended by at least 4.2 million people.

What if they can fuse these protesters, many of whom have never been politically active, into the liberal firmament? What if a new tea party is arising, with the energy and enthusiasm to bring out new voters and make a real difference at the polls, starting with the 2018 midterm elections?

Tom Garrett Attempts To Hide His Tea Party Loyalties

genni@janeforcongress.com
(434) 466-7496
CONTACT: Genevieve Cox

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

For the Record: Tom Garrett’s Top Ten Most Ridiculous Lies

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CHARLOTTESVILLE—Despite Garrett’s repeated pledges to join the congressional right-wing Republican “Freedom Caucus” if elected, and his repeated pledges to shut down the government if elected, he continues to attempt to distort and mask his true intentions.

Just this week, Garrett claimed to the Lynchburg News & Advance editorial board that the Freedom Caucus “likely isn’t in his future.”

But days earlier the newspaper reported again on Garrett’s pledge to join the Freedom Caucus. “During the nomination contest, Garrett committed to joining, if asked, the Freedom Caucus — a group of about 40 hard-right Republicans who have proudly disrupted congressional business.”

Speaking in Madison County on October 5, 2016, Garrett repeatedly declared that he “absolutely would support shutting the government down.” (see video)

Additionally, in a March 28, 2016 blog post endorsing Senator Garrett, Virginia Right noted, “Tom told me recently and it was for publication that he WILL join the Freedom Caucus if elected.

Despite Garrett’s unrelenting commitment to Tea Party and Freedom Caucus objectives, he callously misleads reporters, editors, and the public in an attempt to mask his true intentions and beliefs.

“He is frighteningly adept at changing his story at a moment’s notice depending on his audience.  He seems to have no moral qualms about deliberately and callously misleading his audience,” said Campaign Manager Tom Vandever. “Despite his rhetoric about the importance of adhering to core principles, it appears that his only core principle is saying whatever he thinks people want to hear in order to get elected.”

Vote NO on the Virginia “Right to Work” Amendment, Question 1 (2016)

Virginia currently has a right-to-work statute that bans employers from requiring union membership. Supporters are seeking to add right-to-work regulations to the Virginia Constitution to prevent future lawmakers from undoing the state’s current laws, according to media reports. Sen. Mark Obenshain (R-26) argued Attorney General Mark Herring (D) and future general assemblies could not be trusted to enforce right-to-work as a statute. Attorney general spokesman Michael Kelly responded that Herring has been consistent with the law, stating, “Everything he has done has been firmly grounded in the law, affirmed by courts and other authorities, and is in line with where Virginians are on the issues.” House Minority Leader David Toscano (D-57) argued the constitution should not be changed “willy-nilly.”

Opponents

  • Northern Virginia Labor Federation[8]
  • Virginia AFL-CIO[9]
  • Madison County Democratic Committee[10]
  • Our Revolution[11]

Arguments against

The League of Women Voters of the Fairfax Area published the following arguments against the amendment:[7]

1. A constitutional amendment is not necessary since Virginia’s current policy has been in effect for over 60 years.

2. A constitutional amendment does not allow for timely modifications.[5]

Sen. George Barker (D-39) argued:[12]

This amendment is downright unnecessary. Right to work laws have been on the books in Virginia for over 70 years. It is ironic that Republicans frequently accuse Democrats of government overreach, and yet they feel it appropriate to reflect in the Constitution something that has been practice for so long.[5]

Sen. Dave Marsden (D-37) stated:[12]

This is a political maneuver in an election year, an attempt by my Republican colleagues, backed by special corporate interests, to weaken the rights of hardworking Virginians.[5]

Delegate Jeion Ward (D-9) said:[13]

Passage of this constitutional amendment highlights the misplaced priorities that House Republicans have adopted and promoted. Building the New Virginia Economy requires a healthy, viable workforce that is paid a livable wage, guaranteed equal pay for equal work, and has access to affordable health care – not needlessly elevating existing law to the state Constitution that hurts Virginia’s workers.[5]

Delegate Charniele Herring (D-46) argued:[13]

Republicans in the Virginia House are playing at pandering partisan politics with an issue that has shown to be time and again a detriment to people who put in a hard day’s work. While I have the utmost respect for the Virginia Way, to enshrine a policy like Right to Work in the Constitution, rather in the code of Virginia where it can be debated and modified, is reckless and at high cost to the taxpayers both morally and financially.[5]

Delegate Mark Sickles (D-43) stated:[13]

In 2016, my friends in the Majority are offering up even more of the Virginia Code for constitutional status without evidence of any threat whatsoever to ‘the Virginia Way.’ Instead of making unneeded changes to the sacred Constitution of Virginia, we should be laser-focused on building the New Virginia Economy by improving and investing in education, research, and developing a better workforce.[5]

More information:

Virginia

The Virginia “Right to Work” Amendment, Question 1 is on the November 8, 2016, ballot in Virginia as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment. A vote “for” the measure supports adding a section to the constitution that would make it illegal for workplaces to require mandatory labor union membership for employees as a condition for employment.

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